Toms TiVo

One of the guys at work here has a TiVo which has been ‘functionally enhanced’ to work in New Zealand (thanks NZTiVo) but it had run out of guide data – he took me around to his place this lunchtime to get things going again, which served to make me realise that it’s been a long time since I’ve played with my TiVo and perhaps a refresher HOWTO could be in order

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Viewing multiple video streams using Linksys WVC54G

We’ve got a couple of Linksys WVC54G IP cameras lying around the office from a previous project, so I was thinking “How hard would it be to create a page I could navigate to from my home PC (or media center) to view live video streams from these cameras?”
Apparently, it’s a bit harder than one would think…

We’ve got a couple of Linksys WVC54G IP cameras lying around the office from a previous project, so I was thinking “How hard would it be to create a page I could navigate to from my home PC (or media center) to view live video streams from these cameras?”
Apparently, it’s a bit harder than one would think…
Continue reading “Viewing multiple video streams using Linksys WVC54G”

Rotateable Racks are Rad!

(Or �Swivelling Shelves are Sweet�) I *finally* got around to installing my HT gear into the rack I bought for it ages back. It�s been one of those parts of the house renovation which I�ve really been looking forward to and now (apart from a bit of cable tidy up and the attachment of the IR blasters) it�s in place!

The basic premise of installing this rack is – I think that Home Theatre (HT) gear, while necessary, is not the prettiest thing to look at and a user friendly lounge shouldn�t force the technology that enables your entertainment in your face. Because of this � I had a dedicated HT cupboard on the architects plans from early on in our renovations and have had my eye on one of these racks ever since a friend of mine told me of their existence.
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Windows XP Video Decoder Checkup Utility

As I’ve posted earlier, I’ve been running Microsoft Windows Media Center 2005 (MCE 2005) for quite awhile and, for the most part it’s great – however I found a utility on the Green Button forums this morning which I wish I’d discovered a loooong time ago…

As I’ve posted earlier, I’ve been running Microsoft Windows Media Center 2005 (MCE 2005) for quite awhile and, for the most part it’s great – however I found a utility on the Green Button forums this morning which I wish I’d discovered a loooong time ago.

The problem I’ve had over the last few months is, that intermittently, I’ll get a ‘Video Decoder Error’ and need to restart the MCE box to resolve it. It points to an issue with video drivers, but – from what I’ve read on the forums over at The Green Button, it’s more likely to be related to ones choice of DVD decoder software.

This is by no means an uncommon issue so it was with some surprise that I learned that, this time last year, Microsoft released a utility to check your DVD decoder software. What it does is explained on the Microsoft site, so follow this link and see if it might be the utility that you too have been looking for.

MCE 2005 – Why Media Center will change the way I’m entertained.

I’ve been playing with home theater applications on and off for a few years, I dabbled with MythTV and the ShowShifter type apps, but I’m now a firm believer in Microsoft Media Center 2005 so this entry will serve as a staging point for me to babble on about it…

Like the subject says, Microsoft Media Center has changed the way I am entertained. I’ve been a keen wee techno geek for many years and since purchasing my first VIVO card [archived] back in 2003(?) I’ve been on the lookout for something which can record my TV and let me watch the stuff I want from my PC – this is important given how long I spend in front of it every day.

Things I want to discuss in this post:

  • My history of HTPCs
  • My TiVo experiences
  • Why MCE 2005
  • Ideal setup
  • The media center future

Back in the crazy days of single life, after I’d dropped close to $1000 on a graphics card I was all keen to create an alternative to the TV / Video combination we had in the lounge, after all – my flatmates outnumbered me and often there’d be broadcast conflicts as to what we all wanted to watch – I also was working a lot longer hours including my evenings, so having a TV window on the desktop appealed to me greatly.
The problem with TV cards back then were they were fairly terrible quality, or stupidly expense, so the VIVO option was a good one as I could simple hook off the back of an old VCR I had lying around and use it’s tuner to get my TV signal into the card. The problem with that was I had no IR blaster to change the channel on the VCR and, in conjunction with a lack of an electronic programming guide, the whole operation was very hands on.
Moving forward from there I dabbled with ShowShifter, I looked briefly at some linux distributions which claimed to do all I wanted but, well Linux STILL scares me despite the number of machines I have running it in my home now doing their little things – so Linux was off the cards, aside from a quick dabble with FreeVo and again with KnoppMyth.

I first saw Microsoft Media Center Edition (MCE) back in 2003 when our GM brought a gorgeous Toshiba notebook home from the states with it pre-loaded. It had interface issues which ddn’t quite ‘work’ and of course ran an NTSC tuner so the TV experience was just a fuzzy black and white, but the potential sparked my interest and I’ve kept an eye on the platform ever since.

While I waited for MCE to arrive in New Zealand, I turned to MythTV and, taking a deep breath (and many hours of time from my patient collegues at work) I suceeded in getting a system working… mostly. The main enabler for getting MythTV going for me was a HOWTO by a chap called Jarod Wilson who had documented his experience on his site. In fact, I was so impressed and greatful, that I made an attempt to document my experience and created a page of my own (which seems to get more traffic than anything else on my site, despite it’s now vintage state).

Microsoft New Zealand finally released (quietly) MCE into the NZ market at the same time that it was launched into Australia, but neither country had an Electronic Programming Guide (EPG) avalible so, it’s adoption to date has been slow to say the least. The good thing however is, that a whole range of communities have sprung up around MCE and extensions to its capabilities, including the ability to ‘modify’ things enough to load your own EPG data. I finally managed to succeed in doing this around the end of 2004 with the help of a number of threads from one of the best communitity sites called The Green Button (it’s a reference to the button on the MCE remote used to launch the app).

Now I’m almost ready to introduce it into my home (which is currently undergoing renovations) and have settled on the following specs which I’ve built up on my desk here at work. This is an excerpt from a response I posted over on The Green Button pertaining to Home Theater PC (HTPC) case recommendations:

I’m currently running a Silverstone ST-LC10B (with the iMon VFD software in conjunction with FrontView for MCE it’s sweet!)

Full specs are:

Mods I’ll probably make are:

  • I’m tempted to dremmel out the fan grills at the back over the twin 60mm fans as they’ve got a bit of turbulence noise coming from them.
  • I’d like to mount the HDD in a housing to eliminate vibration as it’s the noisiest thing in the system.
  • I’d like to crack open my MCE remote and drop the sensor into the front of the VFD for WAF (Wife Approval Factor) reasons alone (less clutter /
    visible wires = less complaints)

The case itself is kinda large, but it’s good for airflow and the ability to select from a wider range of cards and cooling product – and I like having a VFD

So that kind of sums up where I am currently, I’ll update this post in awhile with a bit more detail.

My Media Center Setup

I’m currently running a Silverstone ST-LC10B (with the iMon VFD software in conjunction with FrontView for MCE it’s sweet!)

Full specs are:

Mods I’ll probably make are:

  • I’m tempted to dremmel out the fan grills at the back over the twin 60mm fans as they’ve got a bit of turbulence noise coming from them.
  • I’d like to mount the HDD in a housing to eliminate vibration as it’s the noisiest thing in the system.
  • I’d like to crack open my MCE remote and drop the sensor into the front of the VFD for WAF (Wife Approval Factor) reasons alone (less clutter / visible wires = less complaints)

The case itself is kinda large, but it’s good for airflow and the ability to select from a wider range of cards and cooling product – and I like having a VFD

Tricks for the TiVo

As part of the on-going duplication of data around the interweb, this page is more for my reference than anything else, but if you find this page (and find it useful, then good on you. The TiVo sites I frequent the most are NZ Tivo – The NZ TiVo Community and Oz Tivo which, despite it’s name – has a lot of valuable resources for us Kiwis too!

  • 30 Second Skip
  • Setting the Time
  • Forcing a Re-index
  • Loading a Manual Slice
  • 30 Second Skip
    The most used feature on our TiVo, great for skipping the lead-in / lead-out of recordings and all that stuff inbetween.

    Grab your TiVo remote.
    Bring up any recorded program.
    On your TiVo remote, key in the following sequence:
    <0>