pfSense: SARG Reports (v2.2.6 Update)

This post follows on from my (surprisingly popular) article “pfSense: SARG Reports Not Showing

After an update to v2.2.6-RELEASE I had re-inherited the same

Error: Could not find report index file.
Check and save sarg settings and try to force sarg schedule.

error.

On jumping onto the firewall via SSH, it appears that, at some point the sarg-reports directory under /usr/pbi/sarg-amd64/local/ had been turned into a symbolic link (this may have happened via the reinstallation of packages following the update).

As such, any attempts to link /usr/local/sarg-reports to /usr/pbi/sarg-amd64/local/sarg-reports would result in;

/usr/local/sarg-reports: Too many levels of symbolic links.

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pfSense: SARG Reports not showing

Image: Error: Could not find report index file. Check and save sarg settings and try to force sarg schedule.
Error: Could not find report index file.
Check and save sarg settings and try to force sarg schedule.

This appears to be a somewhat common problem with the more recent pfSense installations, when SARG reports are accessed ({Status} > {Sarg Reports} > [View Report] Tab) the UI responds with:

Error: Could not find report index file.
Check and save sarg settings and try to force sarg schedule.

Edit: 02/01/2016 – After an update to v2.2.6-RELEASE I had re-inherited the same error, this time however, it was caused by symbolic link weirdness – See the fix here.

Some users have reported that changing options in the [General] tab, saving, then forcing a schedule has resolved this issue, I have not been so lucky, so the following is what I needed to do to fix things.

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Tweaking the Home Network – pfSense Firewall [Part 3: Monitoring Your Network]

Monitoring the NetworkNow that pfSense is connecting through your home LAN and serving addresses to the ‘Teenage Subnet’, we need to do some further tweaking to make sure we can keep our semi-hostile network safe as well as keeping an eye on our network traffic usage and what our users are accessing.

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Tweaking the Home Network – pfSense Firewall [Part 2: Initial Configuration]

Initial Configuration (via Web Browser)

In the previous article, we set up (at least) two network interfaces. The first, facing the Internet (the WAN) and the second facing the internal network (the LAN).

In our instance, our WAN interface will simply pass traffic onto our existing internal network, where it is subject to existing rules and management, while the LAN interface will become the first node of our new ‘Teenage Subnet’ through which our older boys (and possibly their friends) will access the network resources (including access to the Internet).

The new network: Users are seperated into subnets

So, anyway, we have a machine happily whirring away running pfSense and two interfaces configured, the WAN and the LAN. Now we need to connect up and get things configured.

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Tweaking the Home Network – pfSense Firewall [Part 1: Installation]

So, now we have teenagers, I’ve realised a need to create a little more separation with our home network. The intent of this is to give them a segment of the network where they can connect their wireless devices, use the internet and allow their friends to also connect their devices when they visit. With freedom comes responsibility, so we also want to be able to enforce limits on the hours of use, conserve bandwidth, and attempt to protect them from malware and viruses.

Future enhancements may include traffic reporting, content filtering – but for now we want to get them off the core network, and onto their own segment.

070523-F-9059M-226So, now we have teenagers, I’ve realised a need to create a little more separation within our home network. The intent of this is to give them a segment of the network where they can connect their wireless devices, use the internet and allow their friends to also connect their devices when they visit.

With freedom comes responsibility, so we also want to be able to enforce limits on the hours of use, conserve bandwidth, and attempt to protect them from malware and viruses.

Future enhancements may include traffic reporting, content filtering – but for now we want to get them off the core network, and onto their own segment.

Continue reading “Tweaking the Home Network – pfSense Firewall [Part 1: Installation]”