Managing Behaviour & Technology – A Night with NEAL

Managing Technology
Image Credit: IBoomMedia/Flickr CC: by-nc-sa

I’ve just arrived back from an evening session on “Managing Technology and Behaviour @ Home” run by Andrew Cowie, Heather Eccles and Alan Curtis from NEAL (Northern Education Access Loop).

I surprised myself by enjoying the session, it wasn’t that I personally learned anything technical, it was all about the presentation of the material which was simply outstanding.


Continue reading “Managing Behaviour & Technology – A Night with NEAL”

Social Scams and Why They Work

Over the last week, as New Zealanders begin to change their jandals (flip-flops / thongs) for shoes, I’ve noted a significant increase in the number of “warnings” being posted in my social network feeds. This is not uncommon and it’s not unique only to my network of contacts as these articles point out.

Scam ImageNow, for the most part, folks in my social stream tend to only get caught on an infrequent basis by these messages. I do my best to flick a link back if it’s an obvious hoax, as do others who we share as common contacts. I have been caught myself and have more than once shared something which, if I’d relied on more than wishful thinking, would/should have been filtered out.

So – why do these attacks work, why do the hoaxes perpetuate, and what can we do as a community to reduce our chances of passing on misinformation to our networks?

The simple answer is diligence. Continue reading “Social Scams and Why They Work”

Going Dark…

You may have noticed that I took the main page of this site offline yesterday and replaced it with this one as part of the Anti-SOPA protest… this post is not related to that action.

Going DarkFollowing a conversation yesterday, the social networks, communities and “non-standard” contact channels that I am active in will now see me “going dark” during working hours (NZDST – currently GMT +13).

This means I will be missing many of the conversations I would otherwise have been able to engage in, commentary directed at me will no longer be addressed in a timely manner, and, essentially, I will become a lot quieter on the subjects that I have previously been active on.

It doesn’t mean I’m dead, it doesn’t mean that I no longer care, it doesn’t mean I’ll be dropping the activities that I believe I can make a difference in – it simply means I won’t be ‘available’ from 08:00 – 19:00, Monday – Friday NZ Time and I will no longer be available for assistance or to be involved in conversations during this time period.

The reasons for this action are purely for perception management and to not disadvantage those with whom I work.

Essentially, there are folk in boxes higher up on our corporate HR chart who have set particular measurements by which my team, and I as an individual, are judged. It has been suggested therefore, that I stick solely to areas of work that the group to which our team now reports is responsible for, rather than continue to be involved across the business as I have previously been engaged. While my day to day responsibilities have never suffered through my extra-curricular involvements, I have a moral responsibility to my team. I need to do what I can to ensure that the handful of measures by which we are judged are addressed as effectively as possible, and any perceptions of ‘distraction’ are eliminated.
While I am more than happy to discuss what I do with anyone who believes I’m operating outside of my mandate, I cannot put the team in a position where they may be affected by my wider activities.

Can you help me manage the transition? Absolutely you can, please make sure you tag me in conversations where I’ve previously waded in, or on subjects that you know I have a particular soapbox.
I’m going to do my best to catch-up with the wider world after the kids are in bed and while I’m in transit to and from work – and we’ll review the whole thing at the end of February.

This is NZRob – not over, and not out.

NetHui 2011 – Day 1: Digital Citizenship – Cyber-Bullying

Digital Citizenship – Combating Cyber-bullying & Harassment

Stream led by: John Fenaughty (NetSafe)

Perhaps the most notable example of standing up against bullying of recent times is that of 16-year old Australian Casey Haynes story (YouTube “Fat Kid takes on Bully”) a video that went viral both online and via traditional prime time media.

When asked, 33.2% of youth surveyed reported they had experienced some form of cyber-bullying in the past year and 52.9% of those had found it distressing.

That’s 17.6% of New Zealand youth surveyed having experienced ‘distressing cyber-bullying’ in the past year – it’s an offensive statistic for anyone wishing to better the environment in which we work, entertain and educate ourselves.
Continue reading “NetHui 2011 – Day 1: Digital Citizenship – Cyber-Bullying”

Notes from Barcamp Auckland 2010

Barcamp Auckland is an annual gathering of developers, designers, start-ups and social-media types. It’s a full day event held in an ‘unconference’ like style, where the attendee (see my attendee & interested folks list on Twitter) set the schedule – and people turn up to discuss topics which interest them.

The following are the session notes I took during this years Auckland Barcamp

Continue reading “Notes from Barcamp Auckland 2010”

Commentary on Corporate Approaches to Social Media

Honestly, this is brilliant – while the clip itself has been mashed up to cover everything from Hitlers replacement motorbike to his choice in gaming consoles, this subtitling by Laurel Papworth (original article) has a bunch of agencies across the ditch resorting to ad-hominems – a classic sign of “oh-bollocks-what-do-we-do-now”.

Disclosure: I have met and spent time with Laurel during a workshop a few years back and was well impressed then, as I have continued to be as I’ve followed her commentary on all things social media. For those interested, I’d recommend following her posts, and subscribing to her podcasts.

TEDxAkl Redux

What. an. event.

There is simply too much to type to do justice to what I got out of last nights event, so I’ll post this entry as it is, unfinished, but linking to some of the cool stuff which was discussed…

Keep up with the tweets surrounding the event here – and I’ll be summarising my notes over the weekend.

For now, check out this vid which was shown as a segway between speakers…

Awesome

Power of People – Why your brand needs to understand buyers

A great presentation by Joakim Vars Nilsen on the power of people (why empowering people is key in marketing). There are more than a few companies who could benefit from watching this deck – and it doesn’t (really) matter what size your business is, the principals remain true, it’s just the speed of uptake which will be the variable.

Here’s a great presentation by Joakim Vars Nilsen on the Power of People (why empowering people is key in marketing).

There are more than a few companies who could benefit from watching this deck – and it doesn’t (really) matter what size your business is, the principals remain true, it’s just the speed of uptake which will be the variable.

Discuss.

Tanking Twimailer (and Trying Topify)

Dump TruckYesterday Alain E. posted the following comment on my Twimailer article

It is like Topify.com before less interesting. And in addition their twitter account is not even working. I personnally tried both and prefer Topify (first because their have a much nicer site) because their emails are better and allow follow back right from the message. In addition, I had too many down time with twimailer…

To be honest, I’ve not had any issues with the [Twimailer] service to date, but this comment sparked my interest – which peaked when I read this article on Read Write Web. It appears that Twimailer has been sold (for a somewhat paltry sum) to an unknown, who is in turn trying to flick off the service to another buyer less than a week after acquiring it.

As a result of this article, I have gone into my Twitter settings, changed my email back to the one used prior to the Twimailer service AND changed my password. I’d suggest that others do the same.

It may seem a little reactionary, but as I use my identity not only for my private tweets but also in support of my work, the potential threat of hijack is too high a price to pay for continued support for a service which has failed to inform its network of some pretty key changes in it’s organisation. Sorry Twimailer, it’s over between us, I’m moving on – and trying Topify

So my thanks once again to Alain for peaking my interest, and to the guys at RWW for keeping across these technologies – these are the reasons that you get my subscriptions to your Twitter and RSS feeds.

Photo Credit: USFarmer / Redman

Security Companies on Twitter

twittercathakzSince moving from the R&D field into the amorphous world of IT security, I’ve been trawling the web to find good resources to add to my list of feeds and help me learn more about what we do as a collective, and how those stories are sold to the non-security folk.

It was with some interest that I clicked the  link IT security vendors worth following on Twitter when today’s Network World security email arrived in my inbox. The article itself makes for some interesting reading, as does the Ãœber list of IT and Network companies using Twitter.

For myself, I’m currently struggling with the streams I already follow and, while applications such as TweetDeck allow me to create groups of twitterers, the sheer volume of tweets I deal with day to day has convinced me to cherry pick some of the selected “best of” tweeters for inclusion on my watchlist. They are as follows:

And of course, you can always follow me on Twitter as @NZRob